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Veddas: The First People Of Sri Lanka

Monaragala, Sri Lanka

The Veddas are Sri Lanka’s indigenous people. Or as they call themselves, the Wanniya-laeto or the Forest Dwellers. Once a proud and independent people, they are now often reduced to tourist attractions. In the face of encroaching influences from the outside world, they are struggling to preserve their traditions and culture. Veddas were originally hunter-gatherers. They used bows and arrows to hunt game, harpoons and toxic plants for fishing and gathered wild plants, yams, honey, fruit and nuts. Many Veddas also farm, frequently using slash and burn or swidden cultivation, which is called “chena” in Sri Lanka Today, the Veddha’s are more modernised as far as at least the cloths are concerned and perfect way to observe Veddha is to organise a camp close to or within a reservation and Veddha’s will be more than glad to show you their ways of life, with an axe hanging from their shoulders and a bow slung behind them, gives you the impression nothing much has changed since the dawn of time for these proud warriors of the forest. For now the Vedda strike a precarious balance between survival and extinction. While the elders of the tribe still breathe, the essence of their identity still exists. But as the younger generations assimilate into mainstream culture in search of greener pastures, and the exploitation from the outside world only heightens, we don't know how much longer our Wanniya-laeto will remain with us.

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Deshabandu Dr. T. Publis Silva

Colombo, Sri Lanka

Chef Publis, Director of Culinary Affairs at the Mount Lavinia Hotel, is a renowned figure in Sri Lanka, recently honored by the President for his service to his country. The author of 23 cookbooks, Chef Publis promotes using healthy, fresh and local ingredients while incorporating traditional Sri Lankan cooking techniques. MOUNT LAVINIA, SRI LANKA — The young Deshabandu Dr. T. Publis Silva had no knowledge or even dreams of cookery when he first arrived at Mount Lavinia Hotel, a heritage hotel in Sri Lanka, in 1956. He was a 19-year-old looking for work. A secondary school dropout from a poor family in a small village on Sri Lanka’s southern coast, Chef Publis had many odds stacked against him, he says. He always had a passion for Sri Lankan cuisine and He made it popular to make your own curry powder, to make Sri Lankan dishes with local produce and to make it fresh without any processed or artificial ingredients All Sri Lankan dishes served at the hotel are made with fresh ingredients, using no artificial flavoring or ingredients Today, Chef Publis is the author of 23 cookbooks, including a miniature cookbook of recipes from the royal household of Sri Lanka’s last king. In celebration of his 80th birthday, in April, he released his latest book, a 1,000-page tome titled “Mahasupavansaya,” or “The Great Chronicle of Culinary Art.” The book is currently being translated into English. Traditional, fresh, local – and medicinal Chef Publis says his journey into healthy cuisine and understanding the nexus between Sri Lankan food and traditional medicine came as a result of an embarrassing incident. Chef Publis found that coriander, cumin and sweet cumin – three spices which are also commonly used in medicinal preparations, and which form the basis of a curry powder – were being mixed with other spices by many Sri Lankan cooks, losing the rich flavor Many of the dishes he learned about had no recipes, so he had to create the dishes anew, using currently available local ingredients. He said that the secret ingredient to any recipe, the one ingredient that makes the dish extra flavorsome, is to cook with love... Description Credit : https://globalpressjournal.com/

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Kurugama Tea Factory, Kandy

Kandy, Sri Lanka

Kurugama Tea Factory is located in Kandy. Put Kurugama Tea Factory on your schedule, and learn what else deserves a visit by using our Kandy attractions planner. The factory was visited as part of a trip to Kandy. Because Of the large vegetation at first there was no visible scale of production, but then we got inside and showed the whole working process: assembly, drying, separation, and so on. It was Telling a varnish, on quite good Russian-everything was clear and understood the main points. Different teas Were shown, as well as some nuances in production. Equipment 90-00 years. Works normally. Quite informative and interesting sightseeing tour of the plant. Photo spread a lot-look, evaluate.

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Sri Lankan Art - Janaka De Silva

Galle, Sri Lanka

Meet the colorful and incredibly talented Janaka De Silva – master carver, artist, and entrepreneur. Spend two days with him in his personal workshop turning an average block of wood into a beautiful, traditional Sri Lankan work of art. Join him and his assistants as they guide you through the history of the local mask and mask making culture, traditional tools, carving techniques, and safety before carving one yourself. The first day of your experience will be spent shaping and carving out the mask. The support staff (also local carvers) will guide you through the process and step in whenever help is needed. The carved our block of wood will be dried overnight and you will return the next day to add in further detail and smooth out the rough edges before painting them either the traditional way, or as you like it. At the end of the experience you will take back with you great memories (and even the skills needed to open your own workshop) and your very own mask”. Janaka, sitting among his latest curated exhibition pieces in the old city of Galle Fort, says, “Since I was small, I have painted images inspired by the civilisations of the great kings, who believed water and its conservation were key elements of a civilised world. In the Galle Fort, I feel very close to the oceanic world, as a lot of the historic buildings, including my art gallery, are made from coral and shells, used as ballast in the old trading ships.” Famous for his mask making master classes and art tours to secret spots, Janaka says, “the ocean is one of the last great mysteries, revealed in programmes like the BBCs Blue Planet series. The more I learn, the more I realise how little we know about the sea that brought so many of us to this magical island to trade.” His long-term aim is to educate people about the importance of the ocean, by having underwater galleries around the island, so we can see first hand how we are linked to the sea. Also, visitors can use the gallery sites for scuba diving and snorkeling experiences. Like his international artistic counterparts in Mexico, Bali and Thailand, Janaka wants us all to join the conversation about border crossings, climate change and, most importantly of all, make us all part of the change we need to see in the world. By creating an underwater art gallery people can take that plunge into the ocean and see inspiring thought provoking sculptures, that might help us all understand better what still remains the greatest mystery of all, the sea.

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